Remembering Jackie Robinson in town where it started_freckle removal aloe vera gel

Remembering Jackie Robinson in town where it startedAs Major League Baseball honours the 75th anniversary of Robinson's historic breaking of the colour barrier, let's not forget where he came from.

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Friday marks 75th anniversary of Robinson's breaking of baseball's colour barrier

Paul Newberry · The Associated Press(Keystone/Getty Images)

Far off the beaten path, way down in southwest Georgia near the Florida state line, a remarkable life began in the most humble of circumstances.

Jackie Robinson was born just outside the small town of Cairo (pronounced "KAY-ro"), the child of sharecroppers struggling to make ends meet in the grinding poverty of the Jim Crow South.

As Major League Baseball honours the 75th anniversary of Robinson's historic breaking of the colour barrier, let's not forget where he came from.

Robinson spent the first year of his life near Cairo. For decades, there was nothing to mark that he was ever there — a forgotten first chapter to one of America's most significant stories.

That has changed over the last quarter-century.

There are now a pair of historic signs honouring Robinson — one downtown in front of the library, another at the remnants of the rural shack where he was delivered by his grandmother, a midwife, on Jan. 31, 1919, less than three months after the end of World War I.
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Even more significantly, the Jackie Robinson Boys & Girls Club was founded about a dozen years ago, striving to create a better life for Cairo's young people, many of whom still face some of the same challenges that Robinson did a century ago.

Stephen Francis, the club's director, proudly notes that it's the only Boys & Girls Club in the entire world to bear Robinson's name.

Its mission certainly would've met with his approval.

"Being named after Jackie Robinson makes us feel a little more special than the normal Boys & Girls Club," Francis said. "But it's also a great responsibility with what he stood for. We have to uphold that and pass it down to the children in our daily programs and the life skills that we teach. We want to make sure we're instilling the character that Jackie Robinson stood for."

What was that?

"It's OK to fall as long as you get back up," Francis replied. "Failing is not falling. Failing is giving up when you fall. You're gonna go through some things. But if something is worth it, it's worth fighting for."

WATCH | Jackie Robinson changes the face of baseball forever:

Jackie Robinson, the first black pro in baseball

35 years agoDuration 4:52In 1946 a rookie second baseman for the Montreal Royals changes the face of baseball forever.4:52

Atlanta MLB team brings World Series trophy

The Jackie Robinson Boys & Girls Club was at the centre of a big celebration Friday.

In a most fitting gesture, the Atlanta MLB team brought its World Series championship trophy to Robinson's birthplace on Jackie Robinson Day.

The whole town was buzzing over its appearance.

"People are cleaning their yards like the the trophy is coming to their house," Francis said, chuckling. "They're cutting their grass and washing their cars and getting their hair done. It's like a big party."

Dr. Linda Walden was among those who planned to attend the trophy celebration. She wouldn't have missed it for the world.

Walden is a third cousin of Robinson's. A native of Queens, she never met Robinson — who died in 1972 at age 53 — but moved to Cairo in the mid-1990s to start a much-needed medical practice in an area that played such a significant role in her family's history.

She was stunned at what she found — or, more accurately, what she didn't find.

No statues. No monuments. Not even a simple marker to commemorate this is where it all began for Robinson. Heck, he wasn't even in the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame (which finally inducted him in 1998).

WATCH | Jackie Robinson homers in 4-hit debut with Montreal Royals:

Jackie Robinson debuts with Montreal Royals

35 years agoDuration 3:46In 1946 a rookie second baseman for the Montreal Royals changes the face of baseball forever.More MLB coverage

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