Norway told to get Cold War bunkers ready amid fears of nuclear fallout_freckle removal cost

Andy WellsAndy Wells·Freelance Writer·3 min read
Pripyat , Ukraine; 14 June 2019; Pripyat is a ghost city in northern Ukraine, founded as the ninth nuclear city in the Soviet Union, to serve the nearby Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. It was officially proclaimed a city in 1979 and had grown to a population of 49,360 by the time it was evacuated on the afternoon of April 27, 1986, the day after the Chernobyl disaster.
A radiation warning at Pripyat, Ukraine, a ghost city that was evacuated the day after the Chernobyl disaster. (Getty)

Fears of another Chernobyl-like disaster in Ukraine have prompted warnings in Norway for citizens to “dust off” Cold War bunkers.

Since invading Ukraine last month, Russian troops have occupied Europe's largest nuclear power plant at Zaporizhzhia as well as at the now defunct plant at Chernobyl, the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident in 1986.

Odd Roger Enoksen, Norway’s defence minister, has now aired concerns that any accident at a Ukrainian power plant that cause a radiation leak could impact his own country if the wind travels in its direction.

According to The Times, defence sources have told civilians in Norway to start “dusting off” their bunkers at home “in case of nuclear alert”.

A view shows the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine, April 12, 2021. Picture taken with a drone April 12, 2021. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
A view shows the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine. (Reuters)
Service members take part in tactical exercises, which are conducted by the Ukrainian National Guard, Armed Forces, special operations units and simulate a crisis situation in an urban settlement, in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine, February 4, 2022. REUTERS/Gleb Garanich
Service members take part in tactical exercises in the abandoned city of Pripyat near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine. (Reuters)

The source told the paper: “Everyone has been warned so if they are using them for storage now they need to make a plan for taking things out.”

A 72-hour warning would be given in advance to get bunkers ready for use.

Enoksen calmed fears that the warning was due to the threat of a nuclear war, rather than fallout from an accident.

He said: “Ukraine has the most production of nuclear power in Europe and if an accident happens, as with Chernobyl, we will all in western Europe be affected by that if the wind goes in this direction.”

Watch: Ukraine warns of Chernobyl radiation leak after power cut

He said Norway was still able to see the effects of Chernobyl adding: “In summer time we can actually see ashes from burning grass in Ukraine.”

The warning comes as US defense officials said Russian forces may have begun to pull out of Chernobyl.

According to the AFP news agency, US defense officials said troops had begun walking away from Chernobyl and moving to Belarus. "We think that they are leaving. I can't tell you that they're all gone," they said.

Norway, which shares a 12-mile land border with Russia, made it compulsory for bunkers to be built in civilian infrastructure like hotels during the Cold War-era.

Norwegians have also been told to stock up on medicines for children in case of radioactive fallout.

(editor:)

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